Eating in Madrid, Granada, and Seville

I have always enjoyed Spanish food with its hearty meals. That being said, one of the goals of this trip to Spain was to taste all the Spanish dishes my sister and I have grown fond of after countless dinners at Señor Alba’s, Señor Terry’s, and Las Paellas, three of Manila’s legitimate Spanish digs.Jamon The beautiful and delicate Spanish ham. I could live off this. My first bite into this delicacy was at breakfast at a cafeteria at the Chamartin Train Station in Madrid after an 11- hour trip from Lisbon. Biting into my bocadillo filled with jamon Iberico, I wondered, if a bocadillo at a train station could be this good, what more if it would be in a proper cafe?Taking a walk at the Puerto del Sol, after dropping our luggages at the hotel, we were delighted with all the jamon shops with tantalizing displays of bocadillos which proved too tempting to resist. Thus, in less than 2 hours, we had our 2nd jamon.Jamon is everywhere and compared to prices at delicatessens back home, are quite cheap. Bought about 180 grams at 2.34€ at a small grocery.It’s often served as a sandwhich (tostada or bocadillo) or as an appetizer.One thing we learned with eating jamon in tostada is they use crusty round breads in which you spread some olive oil and tomato puree. Life changing. Sopa de Ajo This garlic soup was one of my mom’s specialties. Hers was a clear soup loaded with garlic and croutons fried in butter. Our experiences with all the sopa de ajo we had in Spain totally blew our minds away. It was so flavorful and had a delicious homey feel. Nothing could be better than taking a table at the Plaza Mayor and taking spoonfuls of the soup to ward off the cold. Museo de Jamon’s soup had achuete which accounted for the reddish color.More savory was La Turcha’s which was brownish and had morsels of ham. Totally different from what we had been having at home, the sopa de ajo had thick slices of crusty bread much like French onion soup.Callos MadrileñoWhere else to have this than Madrid? I was warned by Rhoda that the original Spanish version was of pure tripe, something I was too fond of. Not if it was melt-in-your-mouth the way it was served to us at El Hylogui. It was perfect with crusty bread to mop up the sauce.GambasAgain at El Hylogui. Large succulent shrimps in olive oil and garlic. According to the restaurant manager, a little brandy is added which explained its slightly sweetish taste. La Dispensa in Seville had smaller shrimps and much more oil. Paella and Arroz A Valencia original, this heart rice dish is truly iconic of Spain. This mixed paella at a restaurant by the Teatro Nacional Madrid had chicken, seafood, and yummy chorizos.At El Giralda in Seville, the menu indicated this oxtail rice dish (22 €) and black rice dish (22 €) as arroz rather than paella. I wonder what makes one different from the other? Both were delicious, though. The black rice was flavored with squid ink and served with aoili.When ordering paella, the prices indicated are per person and restaurants require a minimum of 2 orders (about 16-19 € per person). However, at El Giralda, the two arroz we ordered were single serve.The paellas were served steaming hot and as it cools, it gets even better as the arboreto rice absorbs the sauce. At Mercadero de Barrera in Seville, you can see the paella being cooked.Asador An asador is a restaurant that specializes in roasts. The pollo asador at El Aguador in Granada was the tastiest and most tender roast chicken I’ve every had. The meat just falls off the bones. It’s a really large chicken, too.The cochinillo at Las Despensa in Seville according to Trip Advisor reviews was tops. Originating in Segovia, we wanted to see how Alba’s roast in Manila compares to the one here. The cochinillo was meatier and tastier. Unfortunately, the skin wasn’t crispy. I think it’s because we arrived quite early. The old man running the restaurant hesitated when we ordered it.Aside from the roasts are the grilled meats. The salted Iberian pork shoulder at El Gradual in Granada was perfection personified. The meat was just the right thickness. It was grilled lightly and very juicy. It was salted perfectly.A hearty stew of rabo del toro (oxtail) is perfect for cold weather. Huge chunks that fall off the bone in a tomato-based sauce at La Turcha in Madrid.Fried Food. When in Spain, be sure to order the starters as they’re very good and if you’re ordering a salad, go really well with it. They also help keep your tummy happy as it waits for 20 minutes for the paella to be served.Trust the Spanish chefs to turn an orherwise mundane dish such as fried food into something extra ordinary. Whether fish, seafood, or meat, it’s always perfectly seasoned and battered and fried just at the right temperature to seal in the juices while keeping the meat cooked and tender.A plateful of El Aguador’s delicate fried baby squid.El Giralada’s pan of fried mixed seafood.Fried lamb at La Turcha.Where to EatWe mostly ate at restaurants as we wanted main courses rather than just tapas. These were always well-appointed places with table settings and well-dressed wait staff. That’s why it’s always good to be dressed well all the time. For breakfast (desayuno) we headed to one of the many cafes for some sandwhiches and coffee. Some are self-service (remember to bring your utensils and plates to the counters before you leave) while others have table service. These places were also perfect for Spain’s famous sweets.We ate so well in Spain. The food was of very high quality and the portions were generous. It would be difficult to taste the main courses when dining alone as you won’t be able to finish all of it. Best to stick to the tapas. What to Order We always ordered a salad, meat, and fish. Sometimes, we had starters too.Bread was also always served before meals.There are also free starters.How much? Main courses are about 15€ to 25 € while tapas are 3.5€ to 8 €. The set meal for the day (menu del dia) is abour 10€ to 11€.What time to eat?Breakfast can be early but lunch is 1:30 to about 4pm and dinner at around 8pm-12 md. Some even OEM at 9pm. There are some restaurants with a sign that says “kitchen all day” which means they don’t close. Perfect for people who can’t adjust their eating times. We stuck to the Spanish way which worked for us as it gave us more time to tour.

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Post navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: